So what happened in February?

At Digital Pathways, we understand a thing or two about cyber security and the risks surrounding data breaches. As you would expect, we strive to keep on top of major events where a firm or individual falls foul of cyber criminals. With the details understood, we can then impart our knowledge and advise people on how best to avoid similar threats.

Despite this, even we couldn’t believe the sheer quantity of attacks that took place in February this year, or the lack of coverage that these breaches and attacks were given. Seeing the many data breaches and cyber security failings still taking place around the world made us wonder whether as a society we are already becoming deaf to the escalating threats posed online. From ransomware attacks that devastate families, to careless and malicious employees causing irreparable damage to an organisation, we all seem to have become desensitised to the risks.

How log management can protect your system

Every PC and server you use will keep an audit of its activity, which gives you valuable insight into the behaviours of its users.

Log management is an essential tool in the battle against cyber-crime. It might not be as glamorous as anti-malware software, or the use of honeypots, but it can be the single most important way of preventing a potential hack. It is effectively the gathering of information from your systems. Every PC and server you use will keep an audit of its activity, which gives you valuable insight into the behaviours of its users. You are able to track exactly who logged in at any given time, and where exactly they were accessing.

Encryption As The Cornerstone Of Big Data Security

Big data programmes benefit organisations in many ways, driving competitiveness and innovation. But they can also increase security risks. One of the most important issues for organisations running big data projects is balancing the need to protect data from misuse, fraud or loss, while ensuring the ability to perform big data analysis is preserved.

Big data sets harness information from multiple sources, such as databases, data warehouses, log and event files, security controls, and user-generated data such as from emails and social media posts. The information collected can be in either structured form, such as in the columns of a database, or unstructured, such as information contained in a word processing document.

Network Computing Awards – Security Product of the Year 2017

The annual Network Computing Awards were held on the 30th March at the De Vere Grand Connaught rooms in London, with former England Cricket Captain, Chris Cowdrey as MC for the evening. The cream of the IT industry was in attendance eagerly awaiting the results of the runners up and ultimate winners for each category.

For the full list of winners & runners up please click here.

This was a proud moment for the Digital Pathways team who were named as the:-

LegalEx Firm Security Award 2017

On 28th & 29th of March, Digital Pathways exhibited at the 2017 LegalEx exhibition at London’s ExCeL. An opportunity to introduce our products and solutions to the legal sector, to solicitors and forward thinking legal professionals looking to understand how technology can improve efficiency and enable them to develop and grow their firms. Cyber security is a key area within the legal sector; as it is in all businesses large and small. Prior to the event Digital Pathways had been nominated and shortlisted as a finalist for the Firm Security Award along with DarkTrace, Hedgehog Security and Key Computers. This award recognises the organisation that has reached outstanding levels in enhancing the security and production of law firm data.

We are so pleased to announce that Digital Pathways was announced as the:-

The eSignature Comes of Age

In recent years, the use of digital or electronic signatures has rapidly increased in an effort to streamline all types of business transactions. The eSignature can not only be used as an actual certifiable signature, just as we did with a pen, but can also be used to encrypt the contents of a document, thus making it accessible only to those whom the owner of the eSignature has granted permission. Furthermore, the protected document can be additionally controlled to ensure that the content cannot be changed.

There are two types of electronic signatures: those based on Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and those that are not. Digital signatures that do not use PKI cannot: offer a unique signature for each user; identify the signer (authentication); detect changes in the documentation after signing (non-repudiation); or offer a guarantee of sole control for the signer (non-repudiation).

Encryption as the Cornerstone of Big Data Security

Big data refers to huge data sets that come about through the phenomenal growth being seen in the volume of information collected, produced, analysed, shared and stored by organisations. By analysing big data sets, valuable insights can be gained into how patterns of data are associated to enable better-informed decision-making, which can aid in competitiveness and drive innovation. According to Gartner, 48% of organisations had invested in big data capabilities in 2016.

Big data sets harness information from multiple sources such as databases, data warehouses, log and event files, security controls such as intrusion prevention systems and user-generated data from sources such as emails and social media posts. The information collected can be in either structured form, such as in the columns of a database, or unstructured, such as information contained in a word-processing document. Increasingly, data feeds are from devices – and transactions from devices – that make up the Internet of Things (IoT) and this looks set to increase dramatically. As well as this, an increasing number of organisations are looking to incorporate data feeds from physical security systems, such as building access control and smart building management systems.

Dealing With The Mobile Nature of Data Sharing in the Legal Sector

The way that we digitally share information has changed dramatically in recent years, thanks to the rapid evolution of cloud storage and increasing intelligence of smart phone technology. What each of these innovations has allowed is more mobility with our data, giving individuals access to vital files and documents from multiple devices almost anywhere in the world. This mobile nature of data allows us to be more efficient with how we share things, and access them, but it does also bring with it inherent risks in terms of digital security.

The legal sector, perhaps more than any other, regularly faces these risks, with firms not always capable of dealing with their data correctly. One common issue for legal firms that is routinely ignored is the ability for employees to access their personal accounts not just from their office machines, but also through a home computer, tablet, or phone. Although this may seem to be a more convenient way to operate, as it enables the team to continue working outside of office hours, the risks are very real.

Digital Security Solutions for SME’s

Often a hacker can remain on your system for months, gathering data, exploiting your network and gradually making their way up the chain.

The small to medium enterprise (SME) owner tends to think they have little or no data that is at all valuable and, as a result, issues of digital security are therefore not important for them. Even some of the more ‘tech savvy’ directors consider that the data they hold is inconsequential and worth very little to a potential hacker. And, as often there is no requirement under PCI rules for SME’s to have security, as they don’t hold credit card or payment details on their network, this view is strengthened.

Why Encryption is the Best Strategy

Data protection, wherever it resides, must form the core of companies’ security systems.

Encryption, in which information is converted from readable format into one that obscures its meaning from those without the authorisation or ability to decipher it, has long been used to protect sensitive information from prying eyes.

Data security as a pressing concern