Do you know if your emails are secure?

Of all the millions of emails sent each day, how many senders even think about whether their messages are secure? Traditional email has the confidentiality level of a postcard – anyone involved in its transport can easily read it. Lack of care becomes even more of a problem when the sender is attaching confidential or sensitive data. Is it being sent to the correct person? Should the attachment be allowed? Even if it is all right to send, how do you know it was received, when it was read and has it been forwarded? Current system notification is not good enough.

With the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) fines looming, now is the time to gain control of emails.

Cybersecurity: What are Insurers Looking For?

Nicola Laver investigates how low firms can satisfy their insurers that their cybersecurity and anti-commercial crime strategies are robust.

Given that research has shown that cyberattacks on UK  law firms increased by nearly 20% between 2014-2015 and 2015-2016, robust cybersecurity strategies are vital issues; furthermore, 73% of the top 100 law firms in the UK were targets of  attacks last year.

CYBER SECURITY PRIORITIES FOR 2017

Cyber security is generally agreed upon as a protection of electronic information, the ICTs that support cyberspace. It is also protection in a number of spaces including personal, professional, and even national. Sometimes, all three of these can interconnect into a cyber nightmare because one element was vulnerable to being attacked, which in turn had a domino effect for the others.

Learning from a cyber attack

New research also reveals that two thirds of UK businesses have no official ransomware policy to guide employees in the event of an attack.

Organisations must protect and educate their users, says Tankard

There are many reasons organisations do not follow the latest software releases but what seems to constantly fail, is the “thought process” around protecting what you have, warns Colin Tankard, managing director of data security company, Digital Pathways.

Tankard explains that in the most recent cyber attack that affected the UK’s NHS as well as organisations around the world, the malware was delivered through spear-fishing emails which, when opened, triggered a cyber-contagion on the internal network.

Are You Protecting Your Documents With A Digital Signature?

Protecting digital documents and being able to verify that the sender of a file is, in fact, who they say they are, is fast becoming a major concern for many businesses.

Whether receiving a document from a business partner, or downloading software from the Internet, the ability to verify the integrity of a file is crucial. Documents that have been tampered with, or created fraudulently, pose a serious threat. A good protection strategy is the use of a digital signature. This is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital file.

The recipient of a document has reason to believe a known sender created it, and prevents them from denying sending it, this is known as authentication and non-repudiation. Like a tamper-proof seal, it indicates that the document was not altered during delivery, its integrity was in tact.

How log management can protect your systems

Every PC and server you use will keep an audit of its activity, which gives you valuable insight into the behaviours of its users.

Log management is an essential tool in the battle against cyber-crime. It might not be as glamorous as anti-malware software, or the use of honeypots, but it can be the single most important way of preventing a potential hack. It is effectively the gathering of information from your systems. Every PC and server you use will keep an audit of its activity, which gives you valuable insight into the behaviours of its users. You are able to track exactly who logged in at any given time, and where exactly they were accessing.

The eSignature Comes of Age

In recent years, the use of digital or electronic signatures has rapidly increased in an effort to streamline all types of business transactions. The eSignature can not only be used as an actual certifiable signature, just as we did with a pen, but can also be used to encrypt the contents of a document, thus making it accessible only to those whom the owner of the eSignature has granted permission. Furthermore, the protected document can be additionally controlled to ensure that the content cannot be changed.

There are two types of electronic signatures: those based on Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and those that are not. Digital signatures that do not use PKI cannot: offer a unique signature for each user; identify the signer (authentication); detect changes in the documentation after signing (non-repudiation); or offer a guarantee of sole control for the signer (non-repudiation).

Encryption as the Cornerstone of Big Data Security

Big data refers to huge data sets that come about through the phenomenal growth being seen in the volume of information collected, produced, analysed, shared and stored by organisations. By analysing big data sets, valuable insights can be gained into how patterns of data are associated to enable better-informed decision-making, which can aid in competitiveness and drive innovation. According to Gartner, 48% of organisations had invested in big data capabilities in 2016.

Big data sets harness information from multiple sources such as databases, data warehouses, log and event files, security controls such as intrusion prevention systems and user-generated data from sources such as emails and social media posts. The information collected can be in either structured form, such as in the columns of a database, or unstructured, such as information contained in a word-processing document. Increasingly, data feeds are from devices – and transactions from devices – that make up the Internet of Things (IoT) and this looks set to increase dramatically. As well as this, an increasing number of organisations are looking to incorporate data feeds from physical security systems, such as building access control and smart building management systems.

Digital Security Solutions for SME’s

Often a hacker can remain on your system for months, gathering data, exploiting your network and gradually making their way up the chain.

The small to medium enterprise (SME) owner tends to think they have little or no data that is at all valuable and, as a result, issues of digital security are therefore not important for them. Even some of the more ‘tech savvy’ directors consider that the data they hold is inconsequential and worth very little to a potential hacker. And, as often there is no requirement under PCI rules for SME’s to have security, as they don’t hold credit card or payment details on their network, this view is strengthened.

Why Encryption is the Best Strategy

Data protection, wherever it resides, must form the core of companies’ security systems.

Encryption, in which information is converted from readable format into one that obscures its meaning from those without the authorisation or ability to decipher it, has long been used to protect sensitive information from prying eyes.

Data security as a pressing concern